Connect with us

Heritage and Culture

Kathaprasangam: Bringing social awareness through art

Published

on

At a time when Kathaprasangam is on the brink of extinction, a young man from Koodaranhi village in Kozhikode is committed to using the art form to raise public awareness about social problems. With the help of his two other team members, S.V. Jayesh, who has been in the business for over 30 years, produces at least one production every month.

“By giving voice to current concerns and challenges that impact people’s lives, we ensure that this art form survives among us.” We weave our own tales and convey them via this most fascinating art form,” adds Jayesh, who was a winner of many State-level competitions during his school years. Kathaprasangam, he claims, has the ability to quickly grab people’s attention and deliver messages via amusement.

Unlike others who just prepare children for contests, Jayesh is teaching over 15 kids from his community to become professional artists.

“We were able to create 17 Kathaprasangam tales on various themes for public awareness during this COVID-19 period alone. Our stories mostly deal with issues like drug abuse, assault on women, the COVID-19 crisis, and farmers’ struggles to survive in the face of the wild animal menace,” says Jayesh, who is currently preparing to present an exclusive Kathaprasangam on E.M.S. Namboodiripad, the State’s first Chief Minister. “We strive to enlist the help of police and government agencies wherever feasible in order to broaden the reach of art-based awareness activities,” he says.

Every evening, the three-person team, which includes story writer Koombara Baby and music director Shaji Augustine, spends at least three to four hours discussing socially relevant stories and bringing them to the audience, spends at least three to four hours discussing socially relevant stories and bringing them to the audience. To reach their audience, they utilise social media channels.

 

Source: The Hindu

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Heritage and Culture

Narasinghapettai nagaswaram gets GI tag

Published

on

By

nagaswaram

Nagaswaram made in Narasinghapettai in Thanjavur district has been granted the Geographical Indication (GI) tag on the application filed by the Thanjavur Musical Instruments Workers Co-operative Cottage Industrial Society Ltd.

“This would assist the craftsmen in receiving assistance from the Indian government as well as other benefits,” said advocate P. Sanjay Gandhi, who submitted the application on behalf of the society and assisted in obtaining a GI tag for several unique Tamil Nadu products.

In the world of Carnatic music, Narasinghapettai, a hamlet near Thiruvidaimarudur, has an inextricable position. Families of craftsmen who excel in making the nagaswaram live here. At the request of nagaswaram wizard Thiruvavaduthurai T.N. Rajarathinam Pillai, N.G.N. Ranganatha Achari created the “pari” nagaswaram, which is today used by nagaswaram players.

S. Gunasekaran, one of the nagaswaram producers, stated, “We think the GI tag would help our trade.”

Before the “pari” nagaswaram, nagaswaram players employed the short “timiri” nagaswaram. “In ‘timiri,’ Suddha Madhyamam cannot be performed. It would be instinctive for musicians to perform it. That’s why Rajarathinam Pillai chose to create an instrument capable of creating suddha madhyamam, “nagaswaram musician Injikudi M. Mariappan said.

He added that “timiri” needed a lot of work from the nagaswaram musicians, and as a consequence, many of them became sick, particularly with hernia.

Nagaswaram is formed by the ‘acha maram’ tree, which is famed for its sturdy features. Narasinghapettai’s Nagaswaram producers purchase antique wooden pillars from dismantled houses. While Mr. Gunasekaran uses traditional ways to create nagaswaram, others have modernised their workshops and switched to machines.

The ‘anusu’, or enhancer, on the front, is made of “vaagai” wood. The reed, known as “Seevali,” is formed from a species of grass that grows along the Cauvery and Kollidam rivers.

Source: The Hindu

Continue Reading

Heritage and Culture

Hoysala temples nominated for UNESCO’s World Heritage List

Published

on

By

Hoysala

The Sacred Ensembles of the Hoysala—the state’s famous Hoysala temples of Belur, Halebid, and Somananthpura—have been selected as India’s World Heritage nomination for 2022–23. According to a PIB announcement on Monday, these protected sites have been on UNESCO’s tentative list since April 15, 2014.

On Monday, Vishal V. Sharma, India’s Permanent Representative to UNESCO, handed over the dossier to UNESCO Director of World Heritage Lazare Eloundou as part of the first phase. The Sacred Ensembles of the Hoysalas have been nominated for UNESCO’s World Heritage List by India! Mr. Sharma tweeted, “Art historians recognise the ensembles’ outstanding sculptural skill as among the greatest in Asian art.”

The Hoysala architects applied their extensive knowledge of temple architecture throughout India, resulting in temples with a basic Dravidian morphology but strong influences from the Bhumija mode, popular in Central India, the Nagara traditions of Northern and Western India, and the Karntata Dravida modes preferred by the Kalyani Chalukyas. As a result, the Hoysala architects made thoughtful and well-informed eclectic choices of characteristics from different temple typologies, which they then changed and supplemented with their own unique creations. As a consequence, an entirely new Hoysala temple shape was born, the PIB announcement said.

Following the application, UNESCO will respond by early March, and the site review will take place in September or October 2022. The dossier will be considered in July or August 2023, according to the statement.

The temples are Archaeological Survey of India protected sites, and the State Government will oversee the protection of state protected monuments around these three monuments since they will contribute to the visual integrity of the area. According to the statement, the state government’s district master plan would include the buffers of all monuments, as well as an integrated management plan and a look at traffic management challenges.

 

Source: The Hindu

Continue Reading

Heritage and Culture

Kolkata’s Durga Puja is now part of UNESCO’s list of intangible cultural heritage

Published

on

By

Durga Puja in Kolkata, one of the country’s greatest cultural carnivals and street art festivals, got significant international recognition on Wednesday when it was added to UNESCO’s Representative List of Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity.

“Kolkata’s Durga Puja has recently been added to the list of # IntangibleHeritage!”The UNESCO Office in New Delhi tweeted, “Inscriptions to Representative List are one of the many ways that #UNESCO campaigns for the promotion and conservation of intangible cultural assets.”

The news was applauded by Prime Minister Narendra Modi, Union Minister of Culture G. Kishan Reddy, and the West Bengal government. For every Indian, this is a source of enormous pride and delight! Durga Puja highlights the best of our culture and values. And Durga Puja in Kolkata is an event that everyone should enjoy, “Mr. Modi said on social media.

According to a press release from the West Bengal government, the addition of Durga Puja in Kolkata is a proud and historic event. “Today is a special day for us.” Bengal is now Biswa Bangla, “the press release said.

UNESCO also applauded the responsible organisations in Kolkata for their attempts to integrate marginalised groups and people, as well as women, in their involvement in conserving the intangible cultural heritage, according to the state government’s letter.

The “well-deserved distinction” would enhance Kolkata’s creative and commercial economy, according to well-known art historian Tapati Guha-Thakurta, who was the field specialist in crafting the Ministry of Culture’s dossier for UNESCO.

“The Durga Pujas of Kolkata have taken on a particular aesthetic character in the last two decades. The Durga Pujas have offered an arena for creative activism in recent years, with artists expressing remarks on current social and political problems, ” said Ms. Guha-Thakurta, author of the book In the Name of the Goddess: The Durga Pujas of contemporary Kolkata.

The number of elements on the list of India’s Intangible Cultural Heritage has climbed to 14 with the addition of Durga Puja. The Kumbh Mela, the world’s biggest peaceful gathering of pilgrims, was inscribed in 2017 and is the most recent addition to the list prior to the Durga Puja. In 2016, yoga was added to the Kumbh Mela.

According to Ms. Guha-Thakurta, the Kumbh Mela is the only large-scale celebration that has been included in the list of intangible cultural heritage, and the others are specialised rituals that are endangered. “We had to convey that Durga Puja is not endangered,” says the author. It’s prospering and evolving at the same time. It is impossible to keep a religious tradition alive in a small community. “Durga Puja became a complicated case as a result of all of this, she noted.

In March 2019, a dossier was presented with the views of several stakeholders and a list of signatures requesting that the centuries-old celebration be included in the list of intangible cultural heritage.

Large-scale installations and pavilions in metropolitan areas, as well as traditional Bengali drumming and goddess veneration, mark the event. During the event, class, religion, and ethnicity divides disappear as groups of onlookers roam around admiring the installations, according to the UNESCO website.

Experts also note that Durga Puja in Kolkata is unusual in that it provides a source of income for a huge number of people, including artisans.

“The inscription of Durga Puja of Kolkata in the UNESCO Representative List recognises the festival’s contribution to sustaining and safeguarding a multitude of traditional arts and crafts, community well-being and economic empowerment, and energising creativity,” said Ananya Bhattacharya, director of Banglanatakdot.com, a social enterprise working for sustainable development through the revival of heritage.

The British Council in India estimated Durga Puja’s creative economy to be worth over 32,000 crores in 2019 and that the event contributed 2.58% of West Bengal’s GDP earlier this year.

 

Source: The Hindu

Continue Reading

POLICY UPDATES