Drone Rules, 2021: Ministry of Civil Aviation publishes new rules for drones

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admin November 5, 2021
Updated 2021/11/05 at 3:36 PM

The Ministry of Civil Aviation (MoCA) published the UAS Rules, 2021 in March 2021, which were seen as restrictive by academia, startups, end-users, and other stakeholders because they required a lot of paperwork, required permissions for every drone flight, and only a few “free to fly” green zones were available. The government has chosen to remove the UAS Rules, 2021, and replace them with the liberalized Drone Rules, 2021, based on public feedback. Drones, or unmanned aircraft systems, help nearly every area of the economy, including agriculture, mining, infrastructure, surveillance, emergency response, transportation, geospatial mapping, defence, and law enforcement, to name a few.

Several approvals have been eliminated, including the unique authorization number, unique prototype identification number, certificate of manufacturing and airworthiness, certificate of conformance, certificate of maintenance, import clearance, acceptance of existing drones, operator permits, R&D organisation authorisation, student remote pilot licence, remote pilot instructor authorisation, drone port authorisation, and drone port authorization. No security clearance will be required before any registration or license issuance for the operating of drones, according to the New Drone Rules.

Drones are not required to be used in green zones. The airspace up to a vertical distance of 400 feet or 120 meters above the area located between a lateral distance of 8 and 12 kilometers from the perimeter of an operational airport that has not been designated as a red zone or yellow zone in the airspace map.

The airspace up to a vertical distance of 200 feet or 60 metres above the area located between a lateral distance of 8 and 12 kilometres from the perimeter of an operational airport that has not been designated as a red zone or yellow zone in the airspace map. The yellow zone around the airport has been decreased from 45 km to 12 km. Microdrones (for non-commercial usage) and nano drones do not require a remote pilot licence. No security clearance is required prior to the issuing of any registration or license.

The new laws would make it easier to invest in drone technology in India and will make the registration procedure easier. The government’s new Drone Rules will provide players in the field more freedom by eliminating restrictive practises and a rigorous licence structure. The digital sky platform’s airspace map will give real-time updates for drone operations in India’s various zones.

 

Source: Press Information Bureau

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